[cryptography] D-Wave Sells First Quantum Computer

lodewijk andré de la porte lodewijkadlp at gmail.com
Sat May 28 10:27:33 EDT 2011


This explaination is the first that really makes sense. Thanks.

(although there is future in quantum computing as in bits with >2 possible
values. This is not a "general computing" quantum computer.)

2011/5/28 Mark Avrum Gubrud <gubrud at umd.edu>

> Lockheed will use the D-Wave device to conduct further "research" on
> contract to the USG (DoD, DHS, IC) under classification (D-wave is I believe
> a Canadian company) which will serve to further cover up its uselessness.
>  They may also use it to spice up marketing for their security services,
> since D-Wave is claiming they can use it to generate "software" for image
> recognition.  Lockheed can then say they make use of 'advanced quantum
> computing, an industry first, to generate algorithms for target
> recognition.'  That should certainly help do the trick when the customers
> are military, government and corporate bureaucrats and politicians.
>
> ----- Forwarded message from Jean-Philippe Aumasson <
> jeanphilippe.aumasson at gmail.com> -----
>
> From: Jean-Philippe Aumasson <jeanphilippe.aumasson at gmail.com>
> Date: Fri, 27 May 2011 12:24:24 +0200
> To: Crypto discussion list <cryptography at randombit.net>
> Subject: Re: [cryptography] D-Wave Sells First Quantum Computer
> Reply-To: Crypto discussion list <cryptography at randombit.net>
>
> Scott Aaronson's take on D-wave quantum computer and recent Nature paper:
>
> http://blogs.forbes.com/alexknapp/2011/05/24/q-and-a-with-prof-scott-aaronson-on-d-waves-quantum-computer/
>
> Excerpts:
>
> "they?re not claiming a ?quantum speedup? ? i.e., to solve some actual
> computational problem faster using quantum coherence.  They?re just
> claiming an observation of the sorts of quantum effects that would be
> a prerequisite to such a speedup"
>
> "researchers have constructed special examples of optimization
> problems where quantum annealing reaches the global optimum
> exponentially faster than classical simulated annealing.  But on the
> other hand, they?ve constructed other examples where quantum annealing
> is just as slow as classical simulated annealing, both of them getting
> trapped in local optima!"
>
> "any claims by D-Wave that the practical value of quantum annealing
> has already been demonstrated need to be taken with a huge grain of
> salt"
>
>
>
>
> 2011/5/27 lodewijk andr? de la porte <lodewijkadlp at gmail.com>:
> > Any word on the kind of processing power this thing is? It really does
> sound
> > like the future, with it's supercooled processor 'n all. They state the
> > price is "consistent with large-scal,high-performance computing systems"
> > whatever that means, could it possibly be worthwhile?
> > From wikipedia:
> >>
> >> quantum annealing?(QA) is a general method for finding the?global
> >> minimum?of a given?objective function?over a given set of?candidate
> >> solutions?(the?search space), by a process analogous to?quantum
> >> fluctuations.
> >
> > Which makes it quite usable, to my suprise.
> > In 30 years I'll have one at home. Not to worry.
> > Best regards,
> > Lodewijk
> >
> > 2011/5/27 James A. Donald <jamesd at echeque.com>
> >>
> >> On 2011-05-27 4:28 PM, Danilo Gligoroski wrote:
> >>>
> >>> I am among skeptics that quantum computers will break RSA1024 or
> ECDSA160
> >>> in the next 35 years, but maybe I have to revise my views.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> http://www.hpcwire.com/hpcwire/2011-05-26/d-wave_sells_first_quantum_computer.html
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> On Wednesday, D-Wave Systems made history by announcing the sale of the
> >>> world's first commercial quantum computer. The buyer was Lockheed
> Martin
> >>> Corporation, who will use the machine to help solve some of their "most
> >>> challenging computation problems." ...
> >>>
> >>> ... D-Wave One uses a superconducting 128-qubit (quantum bit) chip,
> >>> called Rainier, representing the first commercial implementation of a
> >>> quantum processor. An early prototype, a 16-qubit system called Orion,
> was
> >>> demonstrated in February 2007. At the time, D-Wave was talking about
> future
> >>> systems based on 512-qubit and 1024-qubit technology, but the 128-qubit
> >>> Rainier turned out to be the company's first foray into the commercial
> >>> market. ...
> >>
> >> 128 quantum bits sounds like a lot, but it is less than it seems,
> because
> >> this is not a general purpose quantum computer, though it can emmulate a
> >> general purpose quantum computer with considerably fewer quantum bits.
> >>
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