[cryptography] Cryptographers win Turing award

ianG iang at iang.org
Thu Mar 14 07:52:08 EDT 2013


I admit to total ignorance, and have an intuition that this is 
probabilistically unacceptable.  Of anyone wishes to explain the 
significance of their work, I'd be grateful.  Meanwhile, here are the 
things I've decrypted:

http://amturing.acm.org/award_winners/goldwasser_8627889.cfm

Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali laid the foundations of modern 
theoretical cryptography, taking it from a field of heuristics and hopes 
to a mathematical science with careful definitions and security models, 
precise specifications of adversarial capabilities, and rigorous 
reductions from formally defined computational problems. Their results, 
jointly and with others, established the now-standard definitions of 
security for the fundamental primitives of encryption and digital 
signatures, and provided exemplary implementations meeting the stated 
security objectives. Even more importantly, their work helped to 
establish the tone and character of modern cryptographic research. 
Jointly and in collaboration with others, they provided stunning 
innovations in the form of random functions, interactive proofs, and 
zero-knowledge protocols, with implications beyond cryptography to 
theoretical computer science in general.

ACM Press release is helpful:
http://www.acm.org/press-room/news-releases/2013/turing-award-12
Wikipedia is too:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Probabilistic_encryption
better copy of the 1984 article:
http://groups.csail.mit.edu/cis/pubs/shafi/1984-jcss.pdf

That article in networkworld is fatally flawed, and thus meets and 
exceeds the standard for press commentary.



iang


On 13/03/13 23:57 PM, Kevin W. Wall wrote:
> MIT professors Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali were
> selected as this year's ACM Turing award winner.
>
> Their work on introducing mathematical formalism to the
> field of cryptography was cited.
>
> http://www.networkworld.com/news/2013/031313-turing-award-267635.html
> --
> Blog: http://off-the-wall-security.blogspot.com/
> "The most likely way for the world to be destroyed, most experts agree,
> is by accident. That's where we come in; we're computer professionals.
> We *cause* accidents."        -- Nathaniel Borenstein
>
>
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