<p>May I forumulate Lewis' first law:<br>
As a discussion amoungst computer scientists continues the propability of the P != NP problem being mentioned tends to to 1.<br></p>
<p>Or was this a law already? It seems familliar.</p>
<p>-Lodewijk "Lewis" AndrĂ© de la Porte</p>
<div class="gmail_quote">On May 29, 2011 4:25 AM, "Nathan Loofbourrow" <<a href="mailto:njloof@gmail.com">njloof@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br type="attribution">> On Sat, May 28, 2011 at 7:05 PM, James A. Donald <<a href="mailto:jamesd@echeque.com">jamesd@echeque.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> <br>>> On 28/05/11 03:37, James A. Donald wrote:<br>>><br>>>> What can be said is that the class of problems soluble by a quantum<br>>>>> computer<br>>>>> is larger than the class of problems soluble by a classical computer.<br>
>>>><br>>>><br>>> On 2011-05-29 9:01 AM, David-Sarah Hopwood wrote:<br>>><br>>>> No, it can't:<br>>>><br>>>>  - for idealized quantum and classical computers (with unbounded memory<br>
>>>    running for unbounded time), those classes are identical.<br>>>><br>>>>  - for quantum and classical computers that can be practically built at<br>>>> any<br>>>>    point in time, and with a limit on the time to find a solution, it<br>
>>>    certainly isn't clear that the class of problems soluble by quantum<br>>>>    computers will be larger (ever). That depends on how big and fast you<br>>>>    can make quantum computers and classical computers.<br>
>>><br>>><br>>> What can be said is that the class of problems soluble by a quantum<br>>> computer with a polynomially large number of components in polynomial time<br>>> is larger than the class of problems soluble by a classical computer with a<br>
>> polynomially large number of components in polynomial time.<br>> <br>> <br>> Wait, was P!=NP proven and I missed it? I thought it was merely an assertion<br>> with overwhelming evidence, but no formal proof.<br>
> <br>> n<br></div>