<div dir="ltr">On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 11:42 AM, Tony Arcieri <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:bascule@gmail.com" target="_blank">bascule@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="im">On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 6:32 AM, shawn wilson <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ag4ve.us@gmail.com" target="_blank">ag4ve.us@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>


</div><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div class="im"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">
I thought that decent crypto programs (openssh, openssl, tls suites)<br>


should read from random so they stay secure and don't start generating<br>
/insecure/ data when entropy runs low.</blockquote><div><br></div></div><div>This presumes that urandom is somehow more "insecure", which is not the case despite the ancient scare-language in the manpage. The security of all stream ciphers rests in secure CSPRNGs. Meanwhile, /dev/random is not robust:</div>


<div><br></div><div><a href="https://cs.nyu.edu/~dodis/ps/rng.pdf" target="_blank">https://cs.nyu.edu/~One of the prdodis/ps/rng.pdf</a><span class=""><font color="#888888"><br></font></span></div></div><span class=""><font color="#888888"><div>
<br></div>-- <br>Tony Arcieri<br>
</font></span></div></div>
<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Not for nothing, but that refers to both random and urandom, showing one problem with the entropy estimation, and another with the pool mixing function.</div></div></div></div>