<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 2013-08-17 10:12 PM, Ben Laurie
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAG5KPzxD=+AixiPS=mX=Exb++xw4VXoqpdQc5UTdGzMcOwKfgA@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <meta http-equiv="Context-Type" content="text/html;
        charset=ISO-8859-1">
      <div dir="ltr">
        <div class="gmail_extra">
          <div class="gmail_quote"><br>
            <div>What "external" crypto can you not fix? Windows? Then
              don't use Windows. You can fix any crypto in Linux or
              FreeBSD.</div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    No you cannot.<br>
    <br>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAG5KPzxD=+AixiPS=mX=Exb++xw4VXoqpdQc5UTdGzMcOwKfgA@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">
        <div class="gmail_extra">
          <div class="gmail_quote">
            <div><br>
            </div>
            <div>So what? BSD's definition is superior. Linux should fix
              their RNG. Or these people who you think should implement
              their own should. Or they could just switch to BSD.</div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    That it does not, implicitly admits that you, Ben Laurie, cannot fix
    linux.<br>
    <br>
    We want that all implementations of /dev/random and /dev/urandom
    behave the same, and that they behave correctly on all machines.  We
    don't have that.<br>
    <br>
    Hence the need for each implementer to reinvent the wheel.<br>
  </body>
</html>