<div dir="ltr">On Sun, Sep 22, 2013 at 7:05 AM, Ed Stone <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:temp@synernet.com" target="_blank" onclick="window.open('https://mail.google.com/mail/?view=cm&tf=1&to=temp@synernet.com&cc=&bcc=&su=&body=','_blank');return false;">temp@synernet.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">There was some criticism from various parties, including from public-key cryptography pioneers Martin Hellman and Whitfield Diffie,[2] citing a shortened key length and the mysterious "S-boxes" as evidence of improper interference from the NSA. The suspicion was that the algorithm had been covertly weakened by the intelligence agency so that they  but no-one else  could easily read encrypted messages.[3] Alan Konheim (one of the designers of DES) commented, "We sent the S-boxes off to Washington. They came back and were all different."[4]</blockquote>

<div><br></div><div>It's now known that the NSA selected S-boxes that hardened the algorithm against differential cryptanalysis. Furthermore, 3DES continues to remain a viable cipher.</div><div><br></div><div>See:<a href="http://www.cosic.esat.kuleuven.be/publications/article-2335.pdf">http://www.cosic.esat.kuleuven.be/publications/article-2335.pdf</a></div>

</div><div><br></div>-- <br>Tony Arcieri<br>
</div></div>