<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 26 December 2013 19:56, Aaron Toponce <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:aaron.toponce@gmail.com" target="_blank">aaron.toponce@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">On Thu, Dec 26, 2013 at 02:53:06PM -0500, Jeffrey Walton wrote:<br>
> On Thu, Dec 26, 2013 at 2:44 PM, Aaron Toponce <<a href="mailto:aaron.toponce@gmail.com">aaron.toponce@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
</div><div class="im">> BBS is not practical in practice due to the size of the moduli<br>
> required. You could probably go outside, take an atmospheric reading,<br>
> and then run it through sha1 quicker. See, for example,<br>
> <a href="http://crypto.stackexchange.com/questions/3454/blum-blum-shub-vs-aes-ctr-or-other-csprngs" target="_blank">http://crypto.stackexchange.com/questions/3454/blum-blum-shub-vs-aes-ctr-or-other-csprngs</a>.<br>
<br>
</div>Understood. BBS was only an example of some way to modify the algorithm to<br>
introduce non-linearity into the system. I thought I had it, but it's<br>
apparent I don't. I'm just grateful I'm not getting shamed and flamed by<br>
cryptographers on this list much stronger in the field than I. :)<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">​Ok, I've only skim-read the blog page that describes the algorithm but on a cursory reading it seems trivially weak/breakable.</div>

<div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">If you view the moving-the-bishop as an s-box lookup, and apply it to itself three times (composition), you end up with another s-box of the same size, lets call it S.  Given S doesn't change, things should be rather easy indeed.  If your cipher is then roughly akin to C[n] = P[n] + S[ C[n-1] ] with all operations taken modulo 2^6 the problem should now be a little more obvious.</div>

<br></div><div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">​While I very much like the idea of using a standard chessboard to run a cipher​ - it's innocuous and the key could be hidden almost in plain-sight - the actual cipher isn't much use, at least not if I've got the gist of it.  If I've misunderstood the description, please correct me (preferably in a more terse description).</div>

<br></div><div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">​Can I suggest doing some preliminary reading on group theory and finite-field maths, and also paying more attention ​to how existing strong steam ciphers are constructed.  One of the reasons Solitaire is useful is because you can mathematically prove certain properties about the cipher operation; also you'll note the entire internal state of Solitaire changes, while your design stays static.</div>

<br></div><div> </div></div></div></div>