<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;"><br><div><div>On Apr 17, 2015, at 3:51 PM, Tony Arcieri <<a href="mailto:bascule@gmail.com">bascule@gmail.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Apr 17, 2015 at 11:56 AM, Ron Garret <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ron@flownet.com" target="_blank">ron@flownet.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">The fact that to use PGP you have to install an application.  (This is true for Peerio as well.)  That turns out to be too much friction for most people.  Whenever you have to install an application you have to decide whether or not you trust the application, and most people have no basis for making that assessment. </blockquote><div><br></div><div>Why should anyone trust your web page?</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Why should anyone trust anyoneís web page?  When was the last time you obtained a software application that was *not* delivered via the web?</div><div><br></div><div>Iím not saying this isnít a problem, just that it is not a problem unique to SC4.  *Every* application has this problem.  Do you use PGP?  Did you build it from source?  Are you sure you can trust your compiler?  Did you verify the signatures?  Are you really confident in the root of your chain of trust?</div><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>Do you expect people to audit the source code every time they use it?</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>No.  SC4 was designed to support a wide variety of risk postures.  If you donít trust my server, you can run SC4 from a standalone file on your own file system.  The code to generate that standalone file is part of the current SC4 distribution.  If you donít trust that, then itís pretty easy to write an SC4 implementation in C.  If you donít trust that then I confess that I am at a loss.</div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>If they don't, perhaps you made a change which exfiltrates the plaintext to your personal server. Perhaps you targeted a single person, and everyone else sees the "real versionĒ</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Yes, all these things are possible, but they are also possible for PGP.</div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>This is why web pages aren't trustworthy for cryptographic purposes.</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Then what do you propose?  If I want to run secure crypto software, how should I do it under the attack model that youíve implied by your questions?</div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>I wrote a blog post on this topic:</div><div><br></div><div><a href="http://tonyarcieri.com/whats-wrong-with-webcrypto">http://tonyarcieri.com/whats-wrong-with-webcrypto</a></div></div></div></div></blockquote></div><br><div>Yes, and I am very sympathetic to this argument.  But the problem is that it applies to anything you download from the web, not just webapps.</div><div><br></div><div>My claim is not that SC4 is secure.  My claim is that SC4 is at least potentially as secure as anything else in todayís world.</div><div><br></div><div>rg</div><div><br></div></body></html>