<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 5/25/2015 11:01 PM, Russell Leidich
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAMVA+-ox=psvF-=bJLKQgvPFGUjLz=eJYk5dVS3084mNJjUPdw@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">
        <div>As annouced here in the original Jytter blog:<br>
          <br>
          <a moz-do-not-send="true" href="http://jytter.blogspot.com">http://jytter.blogspot.com</a><br>
          <br>
          <div>It has been a long 3 years since Jytter was released.
            Enranda is now available for download, analysis, and
            criticism. It's open source with awesome licensing terms,
            courtesy of Tigerspike:<br>
            <br>
            <a moz-do-not-send="true" href="http://tigerspike.com">http://tigerspike.com</a><br>
            <br>
            Enranda is a cryptographically secure (in the postquantum
            sense) true random number generator requiring nothing but a
            timer (ideally, the CPU timestamp counter). It produces
            roughly 4 megabytes of noise per second, which puts it in
            the same bandwidth league as physical quantum dot entropy
            sources (from camera pixel noise). It would be easy to reach
            much higher bandwidths by reading the timer in a tight loop
            while feeding it into a PRNG, but probably not safely so.
            The documentation goes to considerable lengths to explain
            this assertion.<br>
            <br>
            If you can demonstrate that Enranda is biased in a
            measurable way, or simply buggy, then you rock.<br>
            <br>
            You can get the commandline demo, the documentation, and
            even a text capture of the live demo at:<br>
            <br>
            <a moz-do-not-send="true" href="http://enranda.blogspot.com">http://enranda.blogspot.com</a><br>
            <br>
            By the way, Enranda's hardness is based in part on
            Dyspoissometer, a new statistical analysis package focussed
            on measuring dyspoissonism, that is, the extent to which a
            discrete set deviates from what we would asymptotically
            consider to be a Poisson distribution. You can get the demo,
            the documentation, and a demo capture at:<br>
            <br>
            <a moz-do-not-send="true"
              href="http://dyspoissonism.blogspot.com">http://dyspoissonism.blogspot.com</a><br>
            <br>
          </div>
          May your ideas be random!<br>
        </div>
        <br>
        Russell Leidich<br>
        <br>
      </div>
      <br>
      <fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
      <br>
      <pre wrap="">_______________________________________________
cryptography mailing list
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:cryptography@randombit.net">cryptography@randombit.net</a>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://lists.randombit.net/mailman/listinfo/cryptography">http://lists.randombit.net/mailman/listinfo/cryptography</a>
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    Are we talking about entropy taken from hard drive turbulence, the
    keyboard or mouse, heat decay, or what?<br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>